§ 12.16.555. Sector control programs  


Latest version.
  • (a)

    General requirements.

    (1)

    Authority. The city may establish specific sector control programs for industrial users to control specific pollutants as necessary to meet the objectives of this chapter. Pollutants subject to these sector control programs shall generally be controlled using best management practices (BMPs).

    (2)

    Facility identification and compliance. The city shall implement procedures to identify industrial users for inclusion into applicable sector control programs. Once identified and included into one or more sector control program, the facility shall be required to comply with the applicable sector control program requirements.

    (3)

    Notification to the city by the industrial user and management review. The city shall review new construction and existing facilities undergoing any physical change, change in ownership, change in operations, or other change that could change the nature, properties, or volume of wastewater discharge, to ensure that current sector control program requirements are incorporated and implemented.

    (4)

    The industrial user shall inform the city prior to:

    (i)

    Sale or transfer of ownership of the business; or

    (ii)

    Change in the trade name under which the business is operated; or

    (iii)

    Change in the nature of the services provided that affect the potential to discharge sector control program pollutants; or

    (iv)

    Remodeling of the facility where the cost is $10,000.00 or more and that may result in an increase in flow or pollutant loading or that otherwise requires the facility to submit plans or specifications for approval through a building or zoning department, or any other formal approval process of a city, county, or other jurisdiction.

    (5)

    Inspections.

    (i)

    The city may conduct inspections of any facility with or without notice for the purpose of determining applicability and/or compliance with sector control program requirements.

    (ii)

    If any inspection reveals non-compliance with any provision of a sector control program requirement, corrective action shall be required pursuant to the applicable sector control program.

    (6)

    Closure. The city may require closure of plumbing, treatment devices, storage components, containments, or other such physical structures that are no longer required for their intended purpose. Closure may include the removal of equipment, the filling in and/or cementing, capping, plugging, etc.

    (7)

    Enforcement and compliance.

    (i)

    These requirements form a part of this chapter. Enforcement of this regulation is governed by the express terms herein and the enforcement provisions of article III, division 5.

    (ii)

    Any extraordinary costs incurred by the city due to interference, damage, pass through, or maintenance necessary in the treatment and/or collection system may be paid by the industrial user to the city. The direct costs of all labor, equipment and materials incurred in rectifying the Interference or damage shall be billed directly to the owner or the industrial user by the city, and such costs shall become part of the total charges due and owed to the city.

    (b)

    Best management practices for the installation and maintenance of gravity grease interceptors.

    (1)

    These best management practices (BMPs) establish requirements for any facility that has the potential to discharge fats, oil, and grease (FOG). These pollutants can contribute to sewer blockages, causing sanitary sewer overflows and backups into homes and businesses. All facilities subject to these BMPs must comply with the requirements which include both the requirement for installation and proper operation and maintenance of an interceptor or separator and other reporting requirements.

    (2)

    Permit required. All FOG facilities will be issued a permit as referenced in subsections 12.16.610(a)(2), 12.16.615(a) and 12.16.620(a).

    (3)

    Applicability. The requirements established in this BMP shall apply to industrial users where preparation, manufacturing, processing of food or washing/sanitizing of dishes or equipment occurs and includes, but are not limited to, restaurants, cafes, fast food outlets, pizza outlets, delicatessens, sandwich shops, coffee shops, schools, nursing homes and other facilities that prepare, service, or otherwise make foodstuff available for consumption. These users shall install and maintain a gravity grease interceptor as directed by the city.

    (4)

    Definitions.

    Best management practices (BMPs): Schedules of activities, prohibitions of practices, maintenance procedures, and other management practices to implement the general and specific prohibitions listed in section 12.16.530 of this article. BMPs may also include, but are not limited to, treatment requirements, operating procedures, and practices to control plant site runoff, spillage or leaks, sludge or waste disposal, or drainage from raw material storage. BMPs are pretreatment standards. Fats, oil and grease (FOG): Non-petroleum organic polar compounds derived from animal or plant sources such as fats, non-hydrocarbons, fatty acids, soaps, waxes, and oils that contain multiple carbon chain triglyceride molecules. These substances are detectable and measurable using analytical procedures established in the 40 CFR Part 136. Gravity grease interceptor: A plumbing appurtenance or appliance that is installed in a sanitary drainage system to intercept FOG (fats, oil and grease) from a wastewater discharge and are designed for gravity separation. Such interceptors are at least 750 gallons, include baffle(s) and a minimum of two compartments. This is an in-ground interceptor that is located outside the facility.

    (5)

    FOG Variance.

    (i)

    A FOG variance as to the requirements may be granted by the director for good cause. The facility has the burden of proof of demonstrating through data and other information why a FOG variance should be granted. In no case shall a variance result in violation of any pretreatment standard or requirement specified in this chapter and applicable to the discharge. The granting of any FOG variance shall be at the sole discretion of the city and may be revoked at the sole discretion of the city. The denial of a FOG variance by the director may be appealed in accordance with section 12.16.660.

    (ii)

    If a FOG variance is granted, the facility shall institute best management practices and other mitigation measures as specified by the city. These BMPs may include, but not be limited to:

    a.

    Allow the installation of a grease trap or continue to allow the use of an existing grease trap in lieu of installing a grease interceptor where the grease trap is shown to be effective. If a grease trap is not shown to be effective, the city may require the industrial user to install a grease interceptor.

    b.

    Provide quarterly cleaning of its private service line to prevent the buildup of oil, grease and solids or as otherwise specified in the wastewater discharge permit;

    c.

    Submit records of the private service line cleaning as specified by the city;

    d.

    Pay the costs incurred by the city for accelerated sewer line cleaning on the city's sewer line providing service to the facility, costs to the city for treating the excess strength waste and any costs for sampling and analysis. The city believes that these costs will be comparable to costs incurred by a user that installs and maintains a grease interceptor.

    (6)

    Program requirements.

    (i)

    General control requirements.

    a.

    A gravity interceptor shall be required for all new industrial users the proper handling of liquid wastes which may be harmful to, or cause obstruction in the wastewater collection system or cause or contribute to interference or pass through.

    b.

    It shall be the responsibility of the industrial user and owner of the property, business or industry or an authorized representative of the industrial user to contact the city for the purpose of obtaining a plan review. The plan review shall determine the need, size, location, and other requirements of the interceptor required to control discharges into the POTW. Written approval from the city must be obtained prior to installation of the interceptor. The review of such plans and operating procedures shall in no way relieve the industrial user from the responsibility of modifying such facilities as necessary to produce a discharge acceptable to the city under the provisions of this chapter.

    c.

    The design and sizing of gravity interceptors shall be in accordance with requirements established by the city as set forth below. The gravity interceptor shall be designed, sized, installed, maintained and operated so as to accomplish their intended purpose of intercepting pollutants from the industrial user's wastewater and minimizing the discharge of such pollutants to the city's wastewater collection system.

    Sizing of Grease Interceptors

    Number of Meals
    Per peak hour
    x Waste flow rate x Retention time x Storage factor Interceptor
    size
    = (liquid capacity)

     

    Meals Served at Peak Hour

    Waste Flow Rate

    a. With dishwasher .....6 gallon (22.7 L) flow

    b. Without dishwasher .....5 gallon (18.9 L) flow

    c. Single service kitchen .....2 gallon (7.6 L) flow

    d. Food waste disposer .....1 gallon (3.8 L) flow

    Retention Times

    Commercial kitchen waste

    Dishwasher .....2.5 hours

    Single service kitchen

    Single serving .....1.5 hours

    Storage Factors

    Fully equipped commercial kitchen

    0—8 hour operation: .....1.5

    8—16 hour operation: .....2

    16—24 hour operation: .....3

    Single Service Kitchen .....1.5

    Construction and Size of Sand Oil Interceptor:

    This formula is based upon square footage area of the facility and other factors. The size calculation is listed below:

    Size = square footage area of the facility/facility factor x 7.48 gal/cu ft x 2 (minimum size shall be 750 gallons).

    Facility
    Factor
    Facility
    15 Truck washes, heavy equipment wash
    50 Automatic car wash
    75 Manual car wash
    100 Machine shop, work area automotive workshops
    2000 Parking garages where cars are washed
    3000 Parking garages

     

    d. Upon change of ownership of any existing facility which would be required to have an interceptor under this section, the applicant for sanitary sewer service shall have the burden to demonstrate that a properly sized and functioning grease interceptor is installed.

    e. Hydromechanical grease interceptors shall not be permitted in lieu of a gravity interceptor to comply with the requirements of this chapter.

    f. Toilets, urinals and similar fixtures shall not waste through a gravity interceptor. Such fixtures shall be plumbed directly into the building sewer and waste system.

    g. All fixtures not equipped with a garbage disposal (garbage grinder) which are connected to a gravity interceptor shall be equipped with a fixed or removable mesh or screen which shall catch garbage and food debris and prevent it from entering the gravity interceptor.

    h. The industrial user shall implement procedures that minimize the discharge of food solids to the POTW, a grease trap or interceptor. In no case shall food waste be discharged that exceeds one-half inch in any dimension. It is prohibited to use garbage grinders for disposal of any non-food waste.

    i. The industrial user must ensure interceptors are easily accessible for inspection, cleaning, and removal of FOG.

    j. The industrial user must maintain interceptors at their expense and keep in efficient operating condition at all times by the regular removal of accumulated FOG.

    (ii) Required maintenance.

    a. Gravity interceptors shall be maintained by regularly scheduled cleaning so that they will properly operate as intended to efficiently intercept the fats, oil and grease from the facility's wastewater and prevent the discharge of said materials into the city's wastewater collection system. A gravity interceptor shall be serviced at a frequency that is specified in the industrial user's permit. Interceptors must be cleaned whenever the combined thickness of the floating greases and settled solids is greater than 25 percent of the design hydraulic depth of the interceptor.

    b. The city may require more frequent cleaning than that prescribed in subsection (ii)(a). A variance from the requirement may be obtained if the industrial user can demonstrate less frequent cleaning is sufficient.

    c. Maintenance of gravity interceptors shall be done by a licensed plumber or contractor normally engaged in the servicing of such plumbing fixtures.

    d. In the event an interceptor is not properly maintained by the industrial user, owner, lessee, or other authorized representative of the facility, the city may authorize such maintenance work be performed on behalf of the industrial user. The costs of such maintenance shall be billed directly to the tenant/owner and shall become part of the charges due and owed to the city.

    e. Biological treatment or enzyme treatment shall not be a substitute for the servicing of gravity interceptors or grease traps at the frequency required by the city. Use of enzymes or any other chemical or biological treatment or product that emulsifies or acts to emulsify FOG is prohibited.

    f. The industrial user must document each pump-out with a waste manifest or trip ticket which must be provided to the city as required and kept by the industrial user on site for at least three years.

    g. The industrial user must take reasonable steps to assure that all waste is properly disposed of at a facility in accordance with federal, state and local regulations (i.e. through a certification by the hauler included on the waste manifest or trip ticket for each load).

    (c)

    Best management practices for dry cleaners.

    (1)

    No person shall discharge, dispose or place dry cleaning solvent, filters, lint etc. from dry cleaning machine cleanout, button trap cleanout, pre-filter cleanout, spent diatomaceous earth, sludge, condensate or separator water, vacuum press condensate, mop water, still bottoms or any other regulated waste material containing dry cleaning solvent into:

    (i)

    Any drain;

    (ii)

    Sanitary sewer or POTW;

    (iii)

    Storm sewer;

    (iv)

    Septic tank or leach field;

    (v)

    Boiler or cooling tower;

    (vi)

    Any underground structure (e.g. tank);

    (vii)

    Dumpster or trash receptacle; or

    (viii)

    On the ground or in any location other than in an appropriate waste storage container.

    (2)

    All waste storage containers shall be properly labeled and such material shall be handled, stored, and disposed of as hazardous waste.

    (3)

    Prior to the purchase and installation of a wastewater treatment unit, such as, but not limited to, an evaporator, atomizer or filtration, the business owner or their authorized representative shall submit detailed plans and specifications of the wastewater treatment unit to the city.

    (i)

    All wastewater treatment equipment shall meet the definition of a wastewater treatment unit as defined in 40 CFR Section 260.10 paragraphs (1) and (2) of the definition.

    (ii)

    The wastewater treatment unit shall be operated and maintained according to all the manufacturer's recommendations and requirements. An operation and maintenance manual of said equipment shall be kept onsite at all times.

    (4)

    A dry cleaning facility wastewater treatment unit shall:

    (i)

    Include a primary solvent water separator settling chamber. This chamber shall recover free-phase dry cleaning solvent from wastewater exiting the dry cleaning machine water separator. Wastewater exiting a primary solvent settling chamber shall be directed into an initial filter having filter media capable of removing dissolved solvent.

    (ii)

    Include a monitor-alarm which shall shut down the wastewater treatment unit and or provide an audio alarm when the initial filter becomes saturated with solvent, indicating mandatory filter replacement.

    a.

    If the monitor-alarm shuts down the wastewater treatment unit, the dry cleaning operator or their authorized representative shall follow the manufacturer's operation and maintenance recommendations for filter replacement and reactivation of the treatment unit.

    b.

    The audio alarm shall be installed to allow users in the office, retail and processing area to hear the alarm. Wastewater treatment units with only an audio alarm shall not be operated except during business hours when the business is staffed. If the audio alarm activates, the operator shall immediately shut down the equipment and wastewater treatment system to prevent the discharge of wastewater to the sewer. The wastewater treatment unit shall not be restarted until proper maintenance and filter replacement is completed.

    c.

    Operation of the treatment unit with the monitor-alarm being bypassed, deactivated or removed shall be a violation of this article and will result in an enforcement action.

    (iii)

    Require wastewater exiting the initial filter be directed into a secondary filter having filter media capable of removing residual dissolved dry cleaning solvent.

    (iv)

    Require exiting the secondary filtration, treated wastewater to be evaporated, misted or atomized. These methods of discharge shall not result in a visible liquid deposition or accumulation so to create a safety hazard or nuisance.

    (v)

    Solvent used shall be as specified by the equipment manufacturer of the dry cleaning unit and approved by the city.

    (5)

    Wastewater generated in a dry cleaning operation may be treated with an alternative device or alternative solvent other than what has been outlined in this article, provided the dry cleaning facility can demonstrate to the city that the alternative unit utilizes a technology that is capable of providing equivalent or better levels of solvent removal and automatic shutdown capabilities. All requests for the installation of an alternative wastewater treatment unit or solvent shall be submitted to the city in writing prior to installation or changing solvents.

    (6)

    All invoices and/or manifests generated as a result of, but not limited to chemical and equipment purchases, equipment maintenance, disposal of dry-cleaning solvent and associated wastes shall be made available for review and copying upon request. All documentation shall be kept onsite for a period of three years.

    (7)

    Secondary containment is a level of containment that is external to and separate from a vessel containing a liquid or solid. It is required for, but not limited to, all dry cleaning equipment, wastewater treatment unit(s) unused cleaning solvent, waste cleaning solvent, used filters, sludge, lint and solids contaminated with cleaning solvent.

    (i)

    Secondary containment shall be constructed of material impermeable to solvent and cleaning fluids used, and able to withstand the weight of the equipment and/or vessels stored within it.

    (ii)

    Secondary containment shall be capable of containing a minimum of 110 percent of the capacity of the largest vessel and be leak proof.

    (iii)

    The secondary containment shall extend beyond the outside perimeter of all dry cleaning equipment to enable collection of any solution that may leak, drip or escape from the equipment.

    (iv)

    Outdoor storage of dry cleaning process chemicals and waste shall be secondarily contained, secured to prevent unauthorized access and covered to protect from contact with precipitation and stormwater.

    (d)

    Best management practices for the acceptance of trucked and hauled waste.

    The requirements established in this section shall apply to persons and operators of companies who discharge trucked and hauled waste at the POTW, including any discharge that enters the city's sewerage system. Where the city elects to accept hauled waste, the following conditions will apply:

    (1)

    Hauled wastes may be introduced into the POTW only at locations designated by the director, and at such times as are established by the director;

    (2)

    The city shall have the right to refuse any hauled waste load;

    (3)

    Waste haulers are prohibited from discharging wastes that would violate any prohibited discharge standards identified in section 12.16.530 of this article;

    (4)

    Waste haulers are prohibited from discharging hazardous wastes to the POTW;

    (5)

    The waste hauler shall comply with specific pollutant limitations established by the city;

    (6)

    The city shall require waste haulers to obtain a permit. The director may require generators of hauled wastes to obtain a permit;

    (7)

    The city may sample and analyze the hauled wastes or require the hauler to perform such sampling and analysis to verify that each hauled load complies with applicable standards and/or requirements;

    (8)

    The city may sample and analyze the hauled wastes or require the hauler to perform such sampling and analysis at the location where the waste is generated;

    (9)

    The city may require the industrial waste hauler to receive prior approval or consent before discharging;

    (10)

    The waste hauler must notify the city of any new commercial or industrial customers or changes in the nature of hauled waste originating from existing customers. Customer lists shall be considered confidential business information if so designated by the waste hauler;

    (11)

    The city may restrict the maximum number of loads that a waste hauler may discharge during a specific period of time, and the discharge rate of each load;

    (12)

    Waste haulers must provide a manifest form or similar for every load prior to discharge. The manifest form shall include, at a minimum:

    (i)

    The name and address of each customer or source of waste;

    (ii)

    Permit number;

    (iii)

    Truck identification;

    (iv)

    Volume of wastewater from each source;

    (v)

    Type of waste to be discharged;

    (vi)

    Known or suspected pollutants present in load(s); and

    (vii)

    Certification that the hauled waste is not hazardous.

    (13)

    The waste hauler shall use a manifest form supplied or approved by the city; and

    (14)

    The city may impose fees or charges for hauled wastes.

    (15)

    The waste hauler shall:

    (i)

    Maintain tanks, pumps, valves, hoses, racks, cylinders, diaphragms, pipes, connections, and other appurtenances on a vehicle in good repair and free from leaks;

    (ii)

    Provide a safety plug or cap for each tank;

    (iii)

    Ensure that the vehicle exterior is clean at the beginning of each work day (prior to entry to the POTW);

    (iv)

    Clean the inside of tanks to ensure that non-permitted residual wastes are not left in the tank and allowed to mix with permitted wastes;

    (v)

    Ensure that tanks are an integral part of a vehicle to transport liquid waste. Portable tanks or other containers temporarily installed in vehicles are prohibited (unless prior approval is obtained from the city, e.g. portable toilets);

    (vi)

    Piping, valves, and connectors (excluding the discharge hose) shall be permanently attached to tank and/or vehicle;

    (vii)

    Tanks must be liquid tight and tanks constructed so that every interior and exterior portion can be easily cleaned;

    (viii)

    Opening of tank to be constructed so that collected waste will not spill during filling, transfer, transport or disposal;

    (ix)

    Outlet connections to be constructed so that no liquid waste will leak, run, or spill out from the vehicle;

    (x)

    Outlets to be of a design and type suitable for the liquid waste handled and capable of controlling flow or discharge without spillage and undue spray on or flooding of immediate surroundings while in use; and

    (xi)

    Pumps, valves, cylinders, diaphragms, and other appurtenances to be of a design and type suitable for the type of waste handled, capable of operation without spillage, spray, or leakage, and capable of being easily disassembled for cleaning.

    (16)

    Permit suspension and revocation. Any permit issued in accordance with this article will be subject to suspension or revocation by the city, at its discretion, for failure to submit accurate reports, failure to submit timely reports, failure to pay proper charges, failure to maintain the vehicle as required, failure to discharge at authorized disposal site(s), failure to meet sanitation standards, discharging of industrial sludges or other unacceptable wastes into the system, for any other infraction of this chapter, or if the director determines it is necessary to protect the city's facilities. The permittee shall maintain valid and current registrations, permits, and licenses as required by any local, state or federal regulation or requirement.

    (17)

    Authorized disposal site(s). Only those disposal site(s) authorized in the permit or otherwise specified in writing by the director shall receive trucked and hauled waste. Disposal of trucked and hauled wastes at sites other than those allowed by permit is prohibited and a violation of this article.

    (18)

    Sanitation and safety standards. Each hauler who discharges wastes to the system shall be responsible for the cleanliness and safety practices at the points of disposal. It shall be the responsibility of the permittee to discharge wastes in such a manner as to keep the area clean and free from spills or other debris. Any spills shall be promptly cleaned up. The permittee is also responsible for keeping his vehicle and related facilities clean and in good repair while being used for disposal to the POTW. These sanitary and safety practices shall be carried out in a manner acceptable to the city. Failure to comply with these sanitation and safety standards shall be grounds for suspension or revocation of the permit.

    (19)

    Quality of wastes. Wastes discharged to the POTW under a permit or approval granted by this article shall be representative of what the permittee disclosed in the permit application and/or manifest and/or manifest specified in subsection 12.16.555(d)(12) and conform to any local, state or federal standards or requirements. The waste hauler consents to the city's right to sample and analyze the contents of any vehicle utilizing the POTW for the discharge of wastes and charge the user for such sampling and analytical costs. The purpose of such sampling and analysis will be to determine conformance with this article, the permit and any local, state or federal regulation. It shall be the responsibility of the waste hauler to assist in sample collection as directed by the city.

    (20)

    Performance bond. The city may decline to issue or reissue a permit to any user who has failed to comply with any provision of this article, a previous permit, or any applicable pretreatment standard or requirement, unless such waste hauler first files a satisfactory bond, payable to the city, in a sum not to exceed a value determined by the city to be necessary to achieve consistent compliance. All trucked and hauled waste haulers shall be bonded in an amount as specified by the city and indemnifying the city against damages sustained by any reason; any spill, dumping or discharge of any liquid waste, hazardous waste, or incompatible waste within the jurisdictional limits of the city. Proof of bonding shall be provided to the city prior to permit issuance.

(Ord. No. 6305, § 1, 8-28-13)